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Brews news

From the established to the shiny new, local brewers pint us in the right direction



A Beer With Citra is a New England IPA style beer brewed by Belt Line Brewery & Kitchen.

Photo by JP Thimot

 

LOCATIONS

Thin Man Brewery

166 Chandler Street
thinmanbrewery.com

 

Belt Line Brewery & Kitchen

545 Swan Street
belt-linebrewing.com

 

Resurgence Brewing Company

55 Chicago Street
resurgencebrewing.com

 

Froth Brewing Company

 

Sato Brewpub

110 Pearl Street
satorestaurantgroup.com

 

Hamburg Brewing Company

6553 Boston State Road, Hamburg
hamburgbrewing.com

 

Buffalo Brewpub

6861 Main Street, Williamsville
buffalobrewpub.com

 

If you’re always thirsty, like we are, you’re tracking the exciting things happening on the region’s beer and brewery fronts. These days, you can’t turn around without bumping into a new spot, and we also like to revisit some of our standby or less covered places.

Some of the most popular places—like Big Ditch, Flying Bison, Community Beer Works, and the Pearl Street Group’s various outlets—continue to forge ahead with great brews, collaborations, events, and tastings in their various locations, and are always worth a visit. Read on for news on recent entries and established local faves.

 

Thin Man Brewery

Photo by JP Thimot

 

Throwing in its estimable lot with Tappo Pizza, Thin Man Brewery has found a winning formula at its Chandler Street hotspot—you can’t go wrong with beer and pizza. Thin Man at Chandler is a lively, casual dining and hang-out spot with games and an outdoor art alley/patio; the place has been open since spring 2019, and is part of the growing Rocco Termini portfolio. Tap into some of TMB’s signature brews, like the Haisy Age, one of several new IPAs. Looking for something weightier? Try the Black Francis, an American style porter, or the Sticky Toffee Stout.

 

Belt Line Brewery & Kitchen

If you’ve eaten at Dobutsu, you’ll have no problem finding Belt Line Brewing & Kitchen—it’s right around the corner. The interior follows the “new urban industrial” style trend: polished concrete floors, evocative long bar ostensibly of reclaimed wood, group tables, and smaller high-tops for schmoozing and boozing. Beer names tend to reference obscure Buffalo history; for example, 13 Flashes, an American-style pale ale, refers to the flag of the City of Buffalo, which has thirteen lightning bolts representing our deep connection to electricity. The makers’ take on a hefeweizen, 111 Straight, honors the YMCA’s Buffalo Germans basketball team that, after competing at the 1902 Pan-American Exposition, went on to win 111 straight games between 1908 and 1910. The food menu is ambitious and slightly more sophisticated than the average brewpub, with vegan and gluten-free options among the pomme frites, Mediterranean plates, guacamole, hot dogs, burgers, and salads offered.

 

Resurgence Brewing Company

Resurgence Brewing Company’s much-anticipated downtown location has opened. The river-adjacent new-old industrial space has its two-story brewing operations in full view. Drinking spaces include a large taproom with an open kitchen, and a narrow, canyon-like outdoor space between two buildings with the requisite cornhole setup, and gaslit fire pits for warming your toes. Their signature IPA is in the West Coast style: a smooth-drinking brew with citrus, pine, and resin notes.

 

Froth Brewing Company

Photo by kc kratt

 

On the northwest side of Buffalo, the newish outpost of Froth Brewing Company goes global with hops sourcing, listing the UK, New Zealand, and the West Coast for its heady varieties. Mallow’d Out, a sour (and sweet) brew, is said to have been brewed with over 200 pounds of marshmallows. Also check out Patience Pays, a brown, chocolaty, oaty, wheaty ale that’s “conditioned” for over fifty-five days. The cavernous space, in an otherwise lesser traveled part of town, feels a little unfinished, and the scant menu—leaning toward finger foods and burgers, and a salad-plus-grilled-chicken option—appropriately skews to the “goes great with beer” categories.

 

Sato Brewpub

Even if you’ve eaten ramen or any of the izakaya-style food (basically snacks and tasty bites meant to be enjoyed after work) at Sato Brewpub, you still might not realize that the subterranean sweet spot also has a minimalist onsite brewery, cooking up some creative and delicious Japanese-influenced beers. As with all brewpubs, what’s on tap varies. Recent brews include Shimbo, a lager supplemented with rice and Hallertau blanc hops and Suppai Yuzu, a tart and juicy brew, accented with yuzu fruit. Sato innovates with Kinoko, a traditional Belgian heavyweight softened with a Japanese twist: eau de shiitake mushroom. The slightly earthy taste also adds a hint of sweetness, pairing well with Sato’s  yummy fatty and savory foods.

 

Hamburg Brewing Company

For something a bit more rustic, we love bellying up at the HBC bar. The amenities of this lodge-like brewery and taproom include a high-ceilinged main room with cozy seating centered around a huge fireplace, as well as a large multi-level patio, complete with cornhole, picnic tables, lawns, geese, and a pond view. Things tend to be basic here: “IPA” is the name of their IPA and, you guessed it, “Irish Red” is, well, an Irish red ale. There are a few cute names, like “Blood Orange Is the New Sour”—fun to say and to drink; fruit is infused into a few of the other current drafts as well. Seasonal offerings include the Oktoberfest, a German-style lager, of course.

 

Buffalo Brewpub

PHOTO BY NANCY J. PARISI

 

Here’s one of the first spots in Western New York for on-site beer production. Unassuming in décor and location (near the corner of Transit and Main in Williamsville), this is now the oldest operating brewpub in New York State. It brews a few of its own, including a lager (a “great first beer of the day” according to the menu), a fruity hefeweizen, an Oktoberfest, and the pub’s flagship Amber Ale. There are also thirty additional taps, offering products from a range of brewers, including highbrow, lowbrow, local, and international. It’s a convivial spot to enjoy lunch, dinner, and, of course, a couple of pints any time.

 

Come back to buffalospree.com for additional reports on WNY’s brewing scene.

 

 

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