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Healing energy therapies

HEALTH



Jim Kupczyk, Balancing Energies.

kc kratt

The nature of health care is changing dramatically, with ever-greater numbers of us seeking alternatives to conventional doctor-, hospital-, and treatment-centered Western medicine. Many of these alternatives, including acupuncture, homeopathic medicine, and yoga and meditation, are well known and widely accepted. Others, though they may have long histories in Eastern cultures and, many believe, solid grounding in science, are only beginning to achieve wider acceptance in the West.

Locally, more WNYers are discovering therapies intended to bring their life-force energy into balance. This energy—chi in Chinese, prana in Sanskrit—is the flow that many believe sustains all living beings.

Jim Kupczyk is a member of a growing community of WNY practitioners who help clients achieve this balance through hands-on and distance healing sessions and energy-infused products, including a t-shirt that’s sold worldwide. Neva Walden is an associate professor currently on leave from Empire State College who has taught complementary healing, among other subjects, for thirty-five years and is certified in Brennan Healing Science and a licensed mental health counselor.

During conversations with Kupczyk and Walden, Spree learned more about energy-balancing therapies and their potential to help WNYers. Here are some excerpts from those conversations.

Kupczyk: I am not the healer. I am merely a conduit; energy comes through me from the universe and from the subconscious. Energy healing involves connecting energies with the client—we are all composed of dynamic patterns of energy—to remove any imbalances so nature can do what is intended and the client can heal him- or herself.

Walden: In a way that’s related to quantum physics, the practitioner is not the generator of energy, but the receiver.

Walden: The more developed a practitioner becomes, the more capable he or she will be of having healing contact with others, even at places like the grocery store. It’s not that the practitioner does anything to them, but that the practitioner has become more open and available to be helpful.

Kupczyk: I am an avid golfer but would not try to convince someone who is not into golf to take up the sport. The same holds true for energy medicine. For some, it just doesn’t resonate, at least at the current time, and that’s fine with me. I will not try to convince them otherwise.

Kupczyk: Ideally it’s not about reacting to an energy imbalance, but about using hands-on and distance healing to start healthy and stay healthy.

Walden: I feel extremely blessed to have found the resources I have to try to be as helpful as I can to other people.

Kupczyk: It’s pretty progressive stuff. Being very analytical myself, I find it hard to comprehend at times.

Walden: How can you help ensure that you don’t go to an unethical practitioner? I’d say, first, trust your gut; second, get recommendations from people you trust; and third, look at the person’s level of training: how extensive it is and what kind, but also whether they have related training, such as in nursing or dance therapy.

Kupczyk: I think it is just as easy to practice here [in Buffalo] as anywhere else on the planet. I don’t advertise; more than ninety-five percent of my clients are referrals. The benefits clients are experiencing definitely help.

Kupczyk: It’s about intention and vibration. It’s about giving the client 120 percent. Focus and then detach.

Walden: Helping someone to increase their energy flow can lead to a deeper spiritual feeling and sense of belonging. This can be true not only for the client but for the practitioner.

For more information about Kupczyk’s practice, go to www.jk-energyhealing.com.

 

Where to find energy medicine

In WNY:

• Acupuncture and acupressure
• Brennan Healing Science (a system of healing that combines hands-on techniques with spiritual and psychological components)
• Quanta Sports Conditioning (developed by Kupczyk to help athletes achieve peak performance)
• Quantum Touch (a therapy that incorporates breathing and body-awareness exercises)
• Reflexology (the application of pressure to parts of the feet or, less often, hands and ears to benefit other parts of the body)
• Reiki (a hands-on technique for stress reduction, relaxation, and healing)
• Therapeutic Touch (hands are placed near, sometimes on, the client’s clothed body)
• Tong Ren (this therapy generally involves tapping on a model of the client to remove energy blockages)

 

Lisa Kane is a freelance writer living in Buffalo.

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